Ann Garry: „Intersectionality: Do Continents Matter?”

November 18-án Ann Garry Fulbright-ösztöndíjas vendégoktatónk, a California State University Professor Emeritája lesz az Ethnic and Minority Studies MA program és a Gender Studies Kutatóközpont vendége. Előadásában az interszekcionalitás kérdéséről beszél majd, vagyis arról, hogy sok-sok társadalmi jellemzőnk (például nem, etnikum, anyagi helyzet) mentén létrejövő pozícióink miként vannak hatással egymásra. Ann Garry az ezzel kapcsolatos amerikai és európai megközelítéseket is összehasonlítja az előadás során, amelyet angolul hallgathatnak meg az érdeklődők.

Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Ethnic and Minority Studies MA program
and
Gender Studies Research Center (ELTE)

cordially invite you to attend a public lecture given by
Professor Ann Garry
„Intersectionality: Do Continents Matter?”

Abstract

Intersectional analyses, widely used in the social sciences and other fields, hold that oppression and privilege by gender, nationality, race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and so on, do not act independently of each other in our lives or in our social structures; instead, each is shaped by and works through the others. Some feminist theorists and activists speak of two different discourses of intersectionality—North American and European—that highlight different facets of our experiences and social structures. I discuss some very recent work on intersectionality to determine whether--today, after two decades of influential scholarship--there are continental differences, and to whom and why the answer matters.

Date: 18 November, 2013 at 18.00
Place: ELTE Faculty of Social Sciences, Lágymányos Campus, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A
Room: 2.54

 No previous registration is required!
(The lecture will be held in English, no interpretation is provided.)

Ann Garry is Professor Emerita of Philosophy at California State University, Los Angeles, where she has taught philosophy and gender studies for decades and was founding director of the Center for the Study of Genders and Sexualities. She has also held visiting appointments including the University of Tokyo, the University of Waterloo, UCLA, and USC, and is teaching this fall in ELTE's Ethnic and Minority Studies Program on a Fulbright grant. Since the 1970’s she has been active in writing feminist philosophy and in founding the institutions of feminist philosophy in the United States, including the journal, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy. She co-edited Women, Knowledge and Reality and a special issue of Hypatia on Transfeminism, She is now is working on a new volume, The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Her articles range from feminist issues in bioethics, pornography, and philosophy of law to intersectionality, analytic feminist epistemology, and philosophical method.

Az esemény linkje a Facebookon

Interview with Ann Garry

Ann Garry has been a Fulbright lecturer at our faculty in the autumn semester 2013/2014. Before leaving Hungary Beata Bosiacka, one of the students of the Ethnic and Minority Studies MA made an interview with Ann about her impressions and experiences in Hungary

About Ann Garry

Ann Garry is Professor Emerita of Philosophy at California State University, Los Angeles, where she has taught philosophy and gender studies for decades and was founding director of the Center for the Study of Genders and Sexualities. She has also held visiting appointments including the University of Tokyo, the University of Waterloo, UCLA, and USC, and is teaching this fall in ELTE's Ethnic and Minority Studies Program on a Fulbright grant. Since the 1970’s she has been active in writing feminist philosophy and in founding the institutions of feminist philosophy in the United States, including the journal, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy. She co-edited Women, Knowledge and Reality and a special issue of Hypatia on Transfeminism, She is now is working on a new volume, The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Her articles range from feminist issues in bioethics, pornography, and philosophy of law to intersectionality, analytic feminist epistemology, and philosophical method.
 
Interview with Ann Garry
 
How did it happen that you left sunny California and came to teach Gender Studies at ELTE?
 
I'm a professor of philosophy at California State University, Los Angles, but I have been teaching also abroad, at the University of Waterloo and as a Fulbright lecturer at University of Tokyo. When I applied for a Fulbright I wanted to come to Europe, especially to one of post-socialist countries, to see how different are the societies affected by the communist regime.
 
So what made you chose Hungary?

I have been to Budapest before and I loved the city. I also knew a few people here, which I thought could be useful since there is not so much time to make friends during one semester. It was very important to me that the Hungarians who I knew before, were all very candid people. I like that, because when you are in a place where people are overly polite and don’t speak candidly, it’s hard to find out anything. But it's not a case with Hungarians. Here if you ask the question, you get the answer. Even if you ask standard “how are you?”, they don’t say just a simple “fine”, you are more likely to hear the whole story about the first day of the semester and how tiring it was. They tell you exactly what they think, how they feel.
 
So you knew what to expect, was there anything that surprise you anyway?

Oh yes, I didn't expect that people work so hard here. I mean, college professors do really a lot for much less money than they should be paid. The life of a professor in Hungary is not easy. And another a new experience, though not a surprise: I am not used to being in a social science faculty. Here I could more fully appreciate the ways that social scientists go to the field and study things. They are, of course, interested in theory, but their work is more empirical. I really enjoyed the lectures that were given in the course called “Contemporary Challenges for Hungarian Society”, even when I couldn't come my husband attended and asked for slides for me.
 
Now the semester is over, how did you enjoy your time in Budapest?
 
I enjoyed it very much. It was so short. It always happens to me that I plan things to do and then there is just not enough time for everything. I also worked harder than I thought I would: I taught two courses, I gave public lecture at ELTE and CEU, I took part in a conference in Germany. But there was also time for pleasure, some traveling. The Fulbright organization takes all of us “fellows” and our families to visit few Hungarian towns, gave us walking tours in Budapest, and organized wine tasting for us. I just enjoyed being in a different place, Budapest is such a different place than Los Angles.

Of course it is, you have more sunshine.
 
Oh, I do miss the sunshine. I'm not so cold here, but my husband is just freezing (laugh). What is also different is that Los Angles is a car-centered place. But I like to be close to things, that's why I really enjoyed walking to the Opera and having public transportation that will take me when places are a little far to walk. Oh, Opera, is very inexpensive here compared to the US....you wouldn't believe what an opera ticket costs in the US, it's something like 150$. Because we can't understand Hungarian, we have been attending a lot of events that don't involve words, such as concerts and operas. The big concert complex, Művészetek Palotája, is just spectacular.
 
If we are already comparing...have you noticed any differences between American and Hungarian students?
 
There are not as many differences as you might think. I guess Hungarians are probably a little bit quieter, but not much. A number of our students in California are of Asian origin. They tend to be very respectful of the teacher, and you need strategies to encourage them to speak in class. But there are also other students who love to talk. It’s also hard to compare, because my students here are all graduate students, either doing a master program or a PhD, while at home I teach undergraduates as well as grad students.
 
Do you have any advice for our students at ELTE?

It would be good idea to interact more widely with people from other disciplines. Where I teach, we don't have people separated on different campuses across the city. All of us are on the one campus, engineers and students in the business school as well as arts, humanities and science students, you can freely interact with different kinds of people. The way the faculties are divided here can cause problems , they are not even in one computer system. I wanted to give a student from the faculty of law access to some of my class materials on CooSpace, but she couldn’t access them because she was in a different faculty. I’d also advise students to talk to their professors more if invited. I think students didn’t take seriously that I really wanted them to come in to chat.
 
You are leaving Budapest soon, where are you going to teach in the future?

Unfortunately I cannot have any more Fulbrights, you have a lifetime limit of two lectureships (laugh).
 
But if you could, where would you like to go?

There are plenty of places, I'd like to come back to Europe or go to Asia. Oh, I know, India! That's totally unknown to me. There are whole big parts of the world that I have never been to. Well, teaching in Africa would be a challenge, I don't think some countries there would want me – an American feminist – to teach there.
 
Since you've already mentioned feminism, let's go back in time for a while. How did you become one of the first American feminist philosophers anyway?
 
I didn't call myself a feminist as a child, because the term wasn't really used yet, but I always wanted to do what I wanted to do. I grew up in a very traditional home, my mother didn't go back to work until I was in high school. It was an era when women were at home with their children, if they could be supported by their husbands. I lived in a very conservative little town in Illinois and couldn't wait to get out of there. And when I did, it was just an accident of timing that the women’s movement was happening. Yet my studies, both as an undergraduate and in grad school, were very traditional academic philosophy, which is very male-oriented. Philosophy is still the most male-oriented of the humanities (laugh). When the woman’s movement started in the late sixties I was in my twenties. It just hit me--I felt “this is me”.
 
And you changed the field of your studies?
 
Not immediately. I kept doing my mainstream philosophical teaching, such as theory of knowledge, but all of my research and writing interests became feminist. My first well known paper was on pornography. It was reprinted frequently, so I would met all these creepy male philosophers at conferences asking me “wanna talk about pornography?”(laugh) Well, I guess that's the risk of writing on pornography. I changed to other feminist topics and and eventually figured out how to make my interests in life and interests in work fit together coherently.
 
Here we get to women studies?
 
As a student, we didn't have it at all, so we had to make it up as young professors. It was so much fun. It's the women of my generation who started women studies. We had to, because it wasn't there. We had to make up courses, start new majors, create new journals and organizations. Being on the ground floor of an academic movement was wonderful: it might not have changed the world as much as we would have liked, but it makes you feel a lot much better.
 
It surely changed some people?

Yes, teaching changes people's life directly, it opens their mind about various things. Whether you are a scientist or humanities professor, you help students open their minds, and they do change how they look at things in life. And now people with email and Facebook, people contact you twenty years later, so you get more feedback. Otherwise you don't know what happened to that person who looked very promising or who looked like a lunatic, but now some of them get in touch, it's nice.
 
Well, I want to thank you for opening our minds on new things and we will also keep in touch. Thank you for this conversation.

Portálkezelői menü Tartalom módosításaUtolsó módosítás dátuma: 2014.07.08.